PORTLAND, Maine – Millennials are going back to school, to learn how to be adults.

“The Adulting School’s first official session took place last week,” The Guardian reports. “During their early presentation, on time management, a number of 26-year-old attendees trickled in late.

“Reports from the summit make it sound not unlike an office party for dogs – participants waggingly sniffing each other, being told when and where to sit. They’d been sent by their parents. There were cupcakes in the afternoon.”adulting

The Adulting School – a Portland, Maine based operation founded by a teacher and psychotherapist – aims show millennials how to do things as an adult they should have learned from their parents, such as how to open a savings account, make a bed, clean a kitchen, and other mundane but important life skills.

From The Adulting School website:

We know you’re sick of feeling like you’re pretending to be a grown-up and that someone’s going to realize you don’t know the sh%#t you’re supposed to know.

You’re putting together the pieces of the puzzle for successful adulting and we’ve got the pieces you’re missing!

You don’t have a ton of time to commit or money to spend on figuring it all out and that’s okay–we have succinct, useable, accessible information in our workshops, summits, webinars and blogs. We’ve gathered quality, down-to-earth experts as part of our community to answer your questions and get you moving forward with the adulting fundamentals you need.

The organization offers classes in financial basics, health and wellness, make-it and fix-it skills, and relationships and communication.

“In the last several years, there’s been growing alarm over the fact that many young people can no longer perform basic skills. In fact, one survey goes so far as to say there are 20 basic skills – ranging from reading a map to baking bread – that are in danger of extinction in some of the developed parts of the world,” according to Intellectual Takeout.

The blog blames the situation on how millennials were raised.

“Parents have been taught that saying ‘no’ to their child could permanently damage that child’s self-esteem. So they’ve given them allowances and provided everything money could buy, but never taught them to effectively earn and wisely manage their own money,” according to the site.

“Parents have also been given the impression that a child should always be entertained. Thus, they involve them in every activity under the sun, but neglect to entertain them with the greatest boredom buster of them all: hard work via chores, which incidentally also trains children in basic household management skills.”

The Adulting School’s next session, Improv For Resolution & Family Communication, is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 3, from 10 a.m. to noon.