LAS VEGAS  – School districts across America continue to push the sex education boundaries, seeking to teach controversial subjects to students at younger and younger ages.

staring girls cropThe Las Vegas Review-Journal reports the Clark County School District – the 5th largest district in America – is seeking parental input on an idea to “expose students to a lot more a lot earlier.”

Considered changes include education of homosexuality as early as ages 5 through 8, and giving everyone “respect regardless of who they are attracted to.”

School children of that age range would also be taught that “touching and rubbing one’s genitals to feel good is called masturbation.”

School officials began airing the curriculum at “closed-door” meetings of parents that were invitation only.

That didn’t sit well with the ones that weren’t invited and they showed up at the school board meeting to eviscerate the idea.

“You want to teach my 5-year-old how to masturbate?” said parent Julie Butler, according to the paper.

“We certainly should not be teaching five-year-olds that masturbation and pleasuring one’s body is good and that a 12-year-old should know about the very details of anal and oral sex,” another parent said, reports KTNV.

According to Fox 5, parent Ronald Withaeger said to school board members, “‘Masturbation should be done in a private place.’ That’s kindergarten through third grade. You’ve got to be kidding me. There’s no need to know that at that age.”

A high school student told the board, “I think I went through about 20 pages and I couldn’t continue with it because some of the stuff was just too disturbing to me at the age that I am and I’m 17-years-old.”

“I felt (the meeting) was quite limited in scope and who was able to attend,” another parent, Nicole Luth, said.

The district has long promoted abstinence, only recently “exposing students to contraceptives and safe-sex practices if they decide to have sex,” according to the Review-Journal.

It’s now exploring a “comprehensive” sexuality model.

More input will be sought from parents at a November advisory committee meeting.

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