Mike Antonucci

Mike Antonucci Mike is the director of the Education Intelligence Agency and has covered the education beat since 1993. Archive »

AFT front group fined $30K for Boston mayor’s race ad buy

Posted on:

BOSTON – Last November a last-minute ad supporting Marty Walsh for mayor of Boston appeared on the city’s TV screens. The ad was financed by the previously unknown super PAC called One Boston, created two weeks before the election, headed by the previously unknown Jocelyn Hutt.
Read More »

14 state teachers unions have almost $700 million in unfunded liabilities

Posted on:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The good folks at Bellwether Education Partners created a web site called TeacherPensions.org in order to focus some much-needed attention on the structure of the retirement system and its financial implications. The site features a range of opinions about teacher pensions, including that of National Education Association president Dennis Van Roekel, who says flatly: “There is no teacher pension crisis.”
Read More »

How the New York teachers union can reduce spending inequality

Posted on:

ALBANY, N.Y. – In an effort to promote its lawsuit against the state’s property tax cap, the New York State United Teachers released an analysis that shows “the wealthiest 10 percent of New York school districts spend 80 percent more educating their students than the poorest 10 percent – a funding inequity that is aggravated by the state’s property tax cap and widens the unacceptable achievement gap.”
Read More »

NEA has 99 problems, but a pitch ain’t one

Posted on:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In front of me is an internal National Education Association document detailing the compiled results of a brainstorming session of the union’s state affiliate leaders and representatives.
Read More »

Patience, patients (updated)

Posted on:

EIAonline

WASHINGTON, D.C. – “We regret to inform you that effective January 1, 2014, we will no longer offer our Individual & Family plans in your county.”
Read More »

Teacher turnover hyperbole gets JOLTed

Posted on:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In order to support the narrative that public school teachers are under assault, we are periodically treated to claims that they are leaving or being driven out of the profession in swarms, mostly because of lousy pay, poor working conditions, standardized testing, and tyrannical principals and administrators.
Read More »