Why the world’s poor choose to pay private school tuition

By Cato Institute on Saturday, August 8th, 2015 in School Choice

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In The Beautiful Tree: A Personal Journey Into How the World’s Poorest People Are Educating Themselves, researcher James Tooley documented how low-cost private schools operated in the world’s poorest areas, from the slums of Hyderabad in India to remote mountain villages in China and shanty towns in Kenya.


Supreme Court to consider ending forced public-sector union dues

By Cato Institute on Sunday, July 5th, 2015 in Unions

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that it would hear Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, which asks the court to consider whether compulsory public-sector union dues violate the First Amendment right to free speech–which includes the right to be free from compulsory speech.


Florida judge dismisses lawsuit against school choice

By Cato Institute on Monday, May 25th, 2015 in School Choice

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – This morning, a Florida circuit court judge dismissed with prejudice a lawsuit by the members of the education establishment against the 13-year old Florida Tax-Credit Scholarship law, which grants tax credits to corporations that make donations to nonprofit scholarship organizations.


Report card: Only 18% of American 8th graders proficient in U.S. history

By Cato Institute on Sunday, May 3rd, 2015 in School Choice

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The latest 8th grade U.S. history, civics, and geography results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress – the so-called Nation’s Report Card – have been released, and as usual, things seem bleak: only 18 percent of students scored proficient in U.S. history, 23 percent in civics, and 27 percent in geography.


Parents and taxpayers want more educational choice

By Cato Institute on Saturday, January 31st, 2015 in School Choice

ATLANTA – Ever since Georgia enacted a scholarship tax credit law in 2008, individual and corporate taxpayers in the Peach State could receive dollar-for-dollar tax credits in return for contributions to nonprofit scholarship organizations—at least until the $58 million cap is reached.


Philly unionists act pretty much how we expect them to at school board meeting

By Cato Institute on Sunday, October 26th, 2014 in Unions

PHILADELPHIA – In poll after poll, parents tell us that they care about academic achievement, but that they also want schools to help instill good values. And since children are adept at drawing lessons from adults’ behavior as well as from their words, it’s always nice when teachers conduct themselves with decorum and sensitivity.